Facts and figures
>Per head of population, 2.3 kg of electrical waste ends up among the non-recyclable waste.
>That is from 10 to 15% of the electrical waste that ends up in the trash can.
>20 E-waste races are planned for 2016.
>65 jobs for people with a disadvantage in the labour market have been created since the start of Weee Nederland.
 

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW ABOUT E-WASTE?

How can e-waste contribute to SROI?

With waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) municipalities can reduce their environmental impact, make best use of their location(s) and resources to collect and/or sort and dismantle waste, and at the same time add social return on investment (SROI). Watch the movie we made on sorting e-waste by people with a distance to the labour market here.

What exactly is e-waste?

E-waste is another term for electronic waste. These are faulty and obsolete electronic devices that are discarded. Examples are equipment with a plug or equipment that needed a battery to function. The official name for e-waste is WEEE, an acronym for ‘Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment’.

How can e-waste contribute to my CSR policy?

We increasingly often hear about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). CSR is commonly called the three Ps: people, planet and profits. As a producer, importer or retailer of electronic and / or electrical devices, there are considerable opportunities in CSR. You can maximise the separate collection of devices at the end of their lifespan and ensure that they are sorted and recycled in the best possible way.

What equipment is covered by WEEE legislation?

The European WEEE directive defines 10 categories of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) which fall within the scope of the directive. In principle, all equipment that is dependent on electric current or electromagnetic fields in order to work properly, falls within the scope. 

What equipment is covered by WEEE legislation?

The European WEEE directive defines 10 categories of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) which fall within the scope of the directive. In principle, all equipment that is dependent on electric current or electromagnetic fields in order to work properly, falls within the scope.